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A Jewish pediatrician’s surprising take on circumcision

Hotly debated on internet forums, banned in some, we take on the topic of circumcision from the perspective of Dr. Ted Handler.

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Your Top Child Nutrition and Behavior Questions, Answered

At Oath, we tackle the topic of nutrition in combination with behavior and emotion. That’s why we brought a pediatrician, pediatric nurse (and grandmother), and marriage & family therapist together to answer the top questions in our community.

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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) 100

So, what’s considered an ACE? ACEs range from abuse, psychological and sexual, to simply living with family members that suffer from mental illness. Find your ACE score and learn more about health correlations.

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Heavy Metals in Baby Food: How to Mitigate Risk of Toxicity

Recent reports show toxic levels of heavy metals in baby food. Don’t panic! Toxic heavy metals in baby food is nothing new, but now that we are aware of their existence, we can take steps to mitigate their effects. Let’s talk about what these new reports mean and what we can do about it.

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Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) 101

At Oath, our model of care is grounded in fundamental research on childhood stress physiology. Stress response can have cascading effects on how children see the world and their actual longterm health. How? Let’s start with the basics.

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Resilience to Stress: The Orchid and the Dandelion Theory

One possible explanation for the variation in responses to ACEs is that more sensitive children are less resilient to the effects of stress in childhood. The Orchid and the Dandelion framework is a reference to the concept of resilience: the idea that some people are innately robust to the harmful effects of stressful events.

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Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing: the importance of context

An analysis by the NYT revealed that many non-invasive prenatal tests were, when positive for some rare genetic conditions, often wrong. So why are they still important?

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